Boiling Springs Tavern

QUESTION:  Boiling Springs, Pennsylvania boasts access to the Yellow Breeches Stream.  How did it get that name?
A)  Jim Breeches, local man, fled the British Army during the Revolutionary War and was called "yellow."
B)  Nobody knows.
C)  British military during the Revolution cleaned their britches in the stream and the sulfur turned their whites yellow
D)  Two families, the Yellows and the Breeches, established a brewery using the stream's water.
ANSWER BELOW

The American  Treasure Tour blog returns today to our phillumeny collection with a matchbook picked up at the Boiling Springs Tavern, located in Boiling Springs, Pennsylvania. Offering "classic American fare with a modern twist," the Keith family has been running the restaurant at 1 East First Street for over thirty years. The menu sounds pretty amazing, although we at the blog have to admit that we have not yet had the opportunity to experience the Tavern, but not out of lack of desire. Honest.

The Tavern was established in 1832 as a way to capitalize on the visitors to the third largest spring system in the United States. Prior to that, the waterways proved an excellent power source for early industry, notably the Carlisle Iron Works where cannonballs were made for the patriots during the American Revolutionary War. After independence, the site became a destination on the Underground Railroad. Its location near the halfway point on the Appalachian Trail proved helpful to fugitives hiding in the mountains. A century later, long-distance hikers stopped there as well. Now, the Keiths provide a wonderful dining experience for residents and visitors after a day relaxing on Children's Lake or hiking the White Rocks Trail.

ANSWER:  C)  British military during the Revolution cleaned their britches in the stream and the sulfur turned their whites yellow.  It's true!