Binoculars

Galileo looking to the sky

Galileo looking to the sky

QUESTION:  David Bushnell, creator of the binocular company, sold his business off to what company in 1971, prior to his retirement at the age of 61?
A). No company - he sold to the U.S. Military
B). Bausch & Lomb
C). Sears
D). Maybelline
ANSWER BELOW:

The American Treasure Tour is loaded to the gills* with odd and wonderful pieces. The blog is here to highlight some of the ones for which there is simply not enough time in the day/week/month/year to point them all out for our visitors. One special piece we would like to honor today is an oversized 'pair of' Bushnell binoculars that hang suspended in our Toy Box, near the wonderful "Loudmouth" Sadie Mae band organ. Of course, we do wonder why we have to pluralize binoculars, and why we call them a pair, when they're obviously just one thing. Like a pair of pants.  But we digress. The point is, there are some pretty amazing binoculars on the tour route and we want to tell you a little bit about them. Because, cool.

1661 Telescope (not part of the ATT collection)

1661 Telescope (not part of the ATT collection)

The first ever recorded use of binoculars goes back. Way back. It should be no surprise that binoculars date shortly after the invention of the telescope. Two is better than one. An understanding of optics dates to antiquity - Ancient Greeks and the like - proved to be a starting point in making distant objects seem close, but the technology was crude until the medieval times. The production of glass lenses for spectacles in the early thirteenth century proved a big step forward, and experimentation over the centuries continued. But the first recorded use of a telescope happened in the year 1608, when Danish innovators put the technology together. The next year, Galileo first used telescopes to look at the night sky, and the process of improving improvements began. Although the claim has absolutely no foundation in fact, the bloggers at the American Treasure Tour like to think of ourselves as technologically savvy. And we would have been happy to explain all the scientific variables that factor into Galilean versus Keplerian optical systems to create the ideal telescope, and the binoculars that came almost immediately on their tail. Unfortunately, we simply don't have the space here. Come back tomorrow, though, for more on our exploration of the wonderful binocular....

*PLEASE NOTE: The American Treasure Tour does not actually have gills. There are, in fact, no living creatures that require gills to breathe at the tour, either. Thank you.

ANSWER:  B). Bausch & Lomb.  Makes perfect sense that a binocular company would be sold off to a ... medical supply company?