Computer Monitors

(At the ATT)

(At the ATT)

QUESTION:  What was the preferred ratio for computer monitors in the United States prior to 2003?
A)  1:14
B)  2:4
C)  4:3
D)  16:9
ANSWER BELOW
The American Treasure Tour is a paradise for people who celebrate technologies old and new. Our collection of automatic music and devices used to record music is exceptional and, some would say, the best in the world.  We also have a notable collection of other pieces on display, including the old top-loading VCR and the laser disc player.  One of the first things you might notice when walking into our Music Room is a pretty special artifact from the 1990's - old computer monitors and tower computers!  They are not something we brag about too often, because there are many other (arguably more) impressive items nearby, but they are definitely a part of technological history.

(Not in the ATT)

(Not in the ATT)

Today, we celebrate the classic, cathode ray tube (CRT) computer monitor that was really the only option into the 21st century.  Once flat screen technology was introduced, and then high definition, this became an endearing part of history.  The colors were not that great, the screen itself was kind of drab, but no one could have anticipated what was to come, so this was all that and a bag of peanuts!  Considering some of the predictions made before, it was also pretty earth shattering.  Take, for example, the following quote, recorded in 1949 in Popular Mechanics magazine:
         "Where a calculator on the ENIAC is equipped with 18,000 vacuum tubes and weight 30 tons, computers in the future may have only 1,000 tubes and weigh only 1.5 tons."
         Or Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, in 1943:  "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers."

ANSWER:  C)  4:3 - the dimensions of the standard television at the time.