Curator Corner

Every Tuesday, May 16th in the year 2017, the American Treasure Tour blog has committed itself to trying something new.  

The blog team has always loved the opportunity to share stories about the pieces in our collection with our army of fans, but we recognize that, every now and again, we need to change things up.  Kind of like when you wear the same shirt every day for three months and realize you should wash it, whether it needs cleaning or not.

I'm the third guy from the left on the 2nd level, wearing a hat.

I'm the third guy from the left on the 2nd level, wearing a hat.

The blog staff took a moment last week to take a group photograph during a cruise along the Delaware River in Philadelphia. The picture is to your right. We were on our way to a casino all-you-can-eat lunch buffet. Apparently, the casino served bad crab legs, which I didn't eat because I was unprepared to stand in line for them. A good thing, since they turned out to be bad. One highly successful class action lawsuit later, and the entire staff (except me, of course) bought themselves a tropical island and left me alone here. So I have the pleasure to entertain you, wow you, surprise you with fascinating knowledge, and quite possibly inspire you to beat the current world record for the largest popsicle stick structure!

Photo taken in its former CT home

Photo taken in its former CT home

Ours is a castle, made by a Connecticutian (Connecticotian? Connecticuter? Mary and Rudi?) named Steve Guman. It has 396,000 popsicle sticks held together with four gallons of Elmer's Glue. It lost the record back in 2009, which is currently held by a team of nine who made a map of Thailand.

When Elmer's Glue was established in 1947, it was part of the Borden's Company. Borden's began producing condensed milk way back in 1857, and has since diversified into canned foods and other stuff, including glue. Their logo includes a cow named Elsie. When the glue came into being, Elsie's 'spouse,' Elmer received the honor of taking the front spot on their glue label. Now, Borden's no longer owns the glue company, but Elmer is staying put, his smiling face inviting us to eat as much glue as we can stuff in our mouths.

 

            Elmer in all his glory!

            Elmer in all his glory!

[Editors' Note: We would like to clarify that, by "eating" the glue, our curator actually meant "to spread the glue smoothly over construction paper so that more construction paper could be placed safely and securely on top of it to make a wonderful montage for mom and dad to put on the refrigerator with your favorite magnet from the American Treasure Tour."  We would like to take the liberty to recommend the magnets for you:  we have a delightful magnet of the 1948 Hudson Commodore for all our young friends.  Or the 1924 Cadillac Sedan.  Or maybe the 1916 Wurlitzer Mandolin PianOrchestra.  Or even the Wurlitzer Model 175 Band Organ magnet.  Okay, let's be real here.  The wonderful montage has four corners, are we right? Unless scissors came into play and someone cut the construction paper into a triangle so it only has three corners, in which case four magnets would give you one magnet too many. But, assuming this does not happen, we're sticking to our recommendation for four magnets.  So, if you get all four magnets, you can put one on each corner.  And, full disclosure, the Editors here think classic cars are cooler than dolls, it's just how we are. It's a purely subjective opinion for which we are completely accountable, and in no way represents the management of the Treasure Tour, some of whom definitely prefer dolls to cars. But that is not the editors, which is why we prioritized the magnets dedicated to the cars over that for the doll, but the Tour does have a delightful magnet of one of the dolls in the collection available for purchase as well.  If dolls are your thing, then you can get the doll magnet instead of any of the other magnets, but it's on you to decide which four magnets to get to secure your construction paper montage on the refrigerator.  The Editors would, at this time, also like to apologize for making our note at the end of the blog longer than the entire blog entry. We think we may have lost our collective minds and, truth be told, we're not entirely sure we're not actually the same person who wrote the first part of the blog and that we are just pretending to be a team of editors instead of one person to make ourselves sound more important.  We mean, to make ourself sound more important. I mean, I want to make myself sound more important. I think we've confused ourselves.  Confused myself. What?  Huh? At this time, we would like to end our Note and encourage you to not read it in the first place. Thank you and have a nice day.]