CDs

Tunes on Tuesday

Sadie Mae.jpg

Music abounds here at the American Treasure Tour.  We not only display hundreds of nickelodeons and band organs, but positively thousands of records, 8-tracks, and sheet music. Don't believe us?  Come on out and count them and prove us wrong!  (We do need to warn you, though, that we cannot allow our guests to have sleepovers here, so you'll have to count fast!) Not only do we display all these wonderful memories, but we also play music.

The paper rolls that are read by our nickelodeons and band organs provide wonderful complements to the machines - they are celebrations of music. Ragtime and jazz (not always easy to differentiate from one another), patriotic music, and yes, we have some quality show tunes playing on our Coinola machine in the Music Room.  Check out some old footage of Sadie Mae - one of our favorite and most famous pieces here at the Treasure Tour!

J.P. Seeburg, part two

QUESTION:  Which of the following companies was not in competition with J.P. Seeburg for jukebox production?
A)  Seeburg
B)  Wurlitzer
C)  Rock-Ola
D)  AMI/Rowe
ANSWER BELOW

Yesterday, we told the story of how the J.P. Seeburg Company became the greatest producer of coin-operated pianos and orchestrions (nickelodeons) in the United States during the 1920's. There were a number of reasons why business started going south towards the end of the decade - competition with radio being the biggest.  In 1927, production was completely shut down on orchestrions, despite the fact that the same year over one million paper rolls sold, the largest number in any one year ever.  Seeburg began to concentrate on what he called coin-operated phonographs.  The "Audiophone" was one of his first multi-selection jukeboxes, which came out the next year.  Then, in the early-1930's, J.P. retired from direct involvement in the business and left it to his son Noel.  Noel devoted his attention to jukebox production and made some innovations that blew away the competition.

In 1949, Seeburg developed the first device that allowed a jukebox to play both sides of a record.  Not only could it hold fifty 78 rpm records, but it could play both sides - allowing people to select between one hundred songs!  Seeburg almost caused all of their competitors to go out of business with this. Then, they took it to the next level the very next year by introducing machines that played 45 rpm records - the first company to do so.  45's had a better sound than 78's and were much smaller. They assured their dominance of the market when, in 1955, they came out with the V-200, which offered two hundred selections.  Over the years, though, jukebox sales fluctuated.  Seeburg tried to roll with the punches, offering innovations and retaining their dominance in the industry.  But, by 1980, they had to close their doors. Their name has appeared on CD jukeboxes and other mechanisms since then, but Seeburg's golden age is no more than a memory, to be celebrated by lovers of technology. Their machines are famously beautiful and a compliment to any collection.

ANSWER:  A)  Seeburg, of course.