The Wizard of Oz

QUESTION:  In the film version of The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy famously wears ruby slippers. What are the slippers made out of in the original book?
A)  ruby
B)  silver
C)  gold
D)  emerald
ANSWER BELOW

One of the most famous movies ever made in the United States has to be The Wizard of Oz - the songs are iconic, and the image of Dorothy wearing her blue-and-white checkered dress and walking down the Yellow Brick Road with her dog Toto and friends the Tin Man, Cowardly Lion and Scarecrow is indelibly burned into the memories of most Americans.  There isn't much that can be said about this movie that has not already been said.  It lost out on the 1939 Academy Award for Best Picture to Gone With the Wind, but has proven itself as significant a piece of American art as the victor.  The music, the color, the fantasy, the incredibly scary wicked witch and flying monkeys, and the adorable little Toto all appeal to people for different reasons. And who hasn't wondered if maybe they didn't have enough courage, heart or brains at least once in their life?

Bob Omrod, the American Treasure Tour's very own master of the miniature, created a number of spectacular dioramas that tell the story of Dorothy and her adventures through Oz that have been on display in the Music Room since August of last year.  There are six amazingly detailed dioramas honoring key moments in the film - the tornado tearing through Kansas, Dorothy's first experience in Munchkinville, the Wicked Witch in front of her castle, Dorothy on the Yellow Brick Road meeting the Tin Man, the Wicked Witch meeting her fate (we don't want to spoil it for anyone who may not know the ending), and Dorothy with her friends in the Emerald City. These and the other creations of Bob Omrod truly need to be seen to be believed, so set up a tour or come in on any Saturday, when we are open without reservations!

ANSWER:  B) silver.  Some speculation exists that Frank L. Baum was making a statement advocating the silver standard for the American monetary system. A far more symbolic interpretation than one might expect for footwear!